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Item
1204
Artist
Benjamin Che Che
Origine
Province of Quebec, Canada
Description
Mother and Child -1976
Condition*
Beautiful condition -
Measurements
Oil on paper 24 x 19 inch - 1970's Frame 30 x 25 - metal brush aluminium
Photography
Provided by Antique, collectibles & Vintage Interchange
Location
Montréal, Canada
Valued

Original Art including Frame*: Suggested Price:       $12, 500.00 CA. (*Estimated replacement price of original frame: $200.00 CA)   

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rollins history
     Benjamin Che Che (1944-1977): 
 

Kenneth Thomas Chee Chee (March 26, 1944 – March 11, 1977), known as Benjamin Chee Chee, was a Canadian artist of Ojibwa descent. He was born in Temagami, Ontario. Chee Chee's early life was troubled and he lost track of his mother, whom he spent many years searching for. He moved to Montreal in 1965 where he developed his love of drawing, and moved back to Ottawa in 1973.

Chee Chee's first exhibition was held in 1973 at the University of Ottawa. Soon after he gained fame as he developed his unique style of clear graceful lines and minimal colour, depicting birds and animals. Though his art featured a great deal of iconography often used by Canadian First Nations artists, Chee Chee had denied his art had symbolic meaning. He instead referred to the animals featured in his art as "creatures of the present". He also specifically referred to himself as an Ojibway artist, as opposed to allowing himself to be categorized under the broader net of simply an "Indian" artist.

After finding his mother and achieving success as an artist, Chee Chee died by suicide in an Ottawa jail in 1977. He was buried in Notre Dame Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario. Chee Chee's work has been exhibited posthumously throughout Canada.

The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabeg group of Indigenous Peoples in North America, which is referred to by many of its Indigenous peoples as Turtle Island. They live in Canada and the United States and are one of the largest Indigenous ethnic groups north of the Rio Grande. In Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the Cree. In the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American tribes, surpassed in number only by the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw and Lakota-Dakota-Nakota people.

The Ojibwe people traditionally have spoken the Ojibwe language, a branch of the Algonquian language family. They are part of the Council of Three Fires and the Anishinaabeg, which include the Algonquin, Nipissing, Oji-Cree, Odawa and the Potawatomi. They also through the Saulteaux branch were a part of the Iron Confederacy joining the Cree, Assiniboine and, Metis.

The majority of the Ojibwe people live in Canada. There are 77,940 mainline Ojibwe; 76,760 Saulteaux and 8,770 Mississaugas, organized in 125 bands, and living from western Quebec to eastern British Columbia. As of 2010, Ojibwe in the US census population is 170,742.

Ojibwe are known for their birch bark canoes, birch bark scrolls, mining and trade in copper, and cultivation of wild rice and, Maple syrup. Their Midewiwin Society is well respected as the keeper of detailed and complex scrolls of events, oral history, songs, maps, memories, stories, geometry, and mathematics.] It is theorized that the Ojibwa created the Dreamcatcher, although it gained more recognition in the Pan-Indianism movement of the 1970s.

The Ojibwe people set the agenda with European-Canadian leaders by signing detailed treaties before they allowed many European settlers into their western areas.

The Woodland School Of Art, also named Woodlands style, Woodlands School, or Anishnabe painting, is a genre of painting among First Nations and Native American artists from the Great Lakes area - including northern Ontario and southwestern Manitoba. The majority of the Woodland artists belong to the Anishinaabeg - notably the Ojibwe, Odawa, and Potawatomi, as well as the Oji-Cree and the Cree. The style is also known as Legend Painting or Medicine Painting.]

Origin

The style was founded by Norval Morrisseau, a First Nations Ojibwe artist from Northern Ontario, Canada.[2] He learned Ojibwe history and culture primarily from his grandfather Moses "Potan" Nanakonagos and in the 1950s collected traditional narratives from his tribe. This oral history has provided inspiration and subject matter for his paintings, and he drew upon dreams and visions.  Morrisseau said, "all my painting and drawing is really a continuation of the shaman's scrolls." Ojibwe intaglio, pictographs, petrographs rock art and birch bark scrolls, Wiigwaasabak, were stylistic antecedents of the Woodland style.

Style

This visionary style emphasizes outlines and x-ray views of people, animals, and plant life.[1] Colours are vivid, even garish. While Morrisseau painted on birch bark initially, the media of Woodland style tends to be western, such as acrylic, gouache, or watercolor paints on paper, wood panels, or canvas.

Woodland style artists

               Jackson Beardy (Anishinini, 1944–1984)

               Benjamin Chee Chee (Ojibwe, 1944–1977)

               Shirley Cheechoo (Cree, b. 1952)

               Kelly Church (Odawa-Ojibwe, b. 1967)

               Eddy Cobiness (Ojibwe, 1933–1996)

               Blake Debassige (M'Chigeeng Ojibwe, b. 1956)

               Maurice DeLangis (ᕿᓇᐅᔭ Onedia of the Thames b. 1959)

               Abe Kakepetum (Sandy Lake Oji-Cree)

               Tom Hogan, (Ojibwe, 1955–2014)

               Norval Morrisseau (ᒥᐢᒁᐱᐦᐠ ᐊᓂᒥᐦᑮ / Miskwaabik Animikii) (Bingwi Neyaashi Ojibwe, ca. 1932–2007)

               Daphne Odjig (Odawa-Potawatomi, 1919–2016)

               Carl Ray (Sandy Lake Cree, 1943–1978)

               Brian Marion (Ojibwe, 1960–2011))

               Roy Thomas (Anishinaabe, 1949–2004)

               Jackie Traverse (Anishinaabe, b. 1968)


Recent Posthumous Exhibitions

1991 Benjamin Chee Chee: The Black Geese Portfolio, and Other Works. Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Ontario

1983 Contemporary Indian Art at Rideau Hall.
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Ottawa, Ontario

1982 Glebe Community Centre, Ottawa, Ontario

1977 Marion Scott Galleries, Vancouver, British Columbia
Links to Tradition.
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (travelling)
Early Exhibitions:

1976 Evans Gallery, Toronto, Ontario
The Sea Chest, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Inukshuk Gallery, Waterloo, Ontario

1974 Doma II Art Gallery, Waterloo, Ontario
Canadian Indian Art '74.
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario

1973 University of Ottawa, Ontario

Selected Collections

Canadian Museum of Civilization, Hull, Québec
Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Alberta
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Ottawa, Ontario
McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinberg, Ontario
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario
Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Thunder Bay, Ontario
Woodland Cultural Centre, Brantford, Ontario

Selected Bibliography

Angus, Murray. "Monument marks grave of artist." Windspeaker 15, no. 4 (August 1997): 8, 24.

Burnham, Clint. Review of The Benjamin Chee Chee elegies by Patrick White. Books In Canada 22, no. 5 (Summer 1993): 59-60.

Canadian Museum of Civilization, ed. In the Shadow of the Sun: Perspectives on Contemporary Native Art. Hull, Québec: The Museum, 1993.

Cardinal-Schubert, Joane. "In the red." In Borrowed Power: Essays on Cultural Appropriation, eds. Bruce Ziff and Pratima V. Rao, 122-133. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1997.

Cardinal-Schubert, Joane. Time for Dialogue: Contemporary Artists. Calgary, Alberta: Aboriginal Awareness Society, 1992.

Dempsey, Ian. Review o f The Benjamin Chee Chee elegies by Patrick White. Canadian Materials 21, no. 1 (January 1993): 14.

McLuhan, Elizabeth, ed. Benjamin Chee Chee: Paintings and Prints in the Collection of the Thunder Bay Art Gallery. Thunder Bay, Ontario: The Gallery, 1984.

Menitove, Marcy, ed. The Permanent Collection: Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Thunder Bay, Ontario: The Gallery, 1986.

Southcott, Mary E. The Sound of the Drum: The Sacred Art of the Anishnabec. Erin, Ontario: Boston Mills Press, 1984.

rollins history rollins history rollins history

Kenneth Thomas Chee Chee
(26 mars 1944 - 11 mars 1977), connu sous le nom de Benjamin Chee Chee, était un artiste canadien d'origine ojibwée. Il est né à Temagami, en Ontario. La jeunesse de Chee Chee a été troublée et il a perdu la trace de sa mère, qu'il a passé de nombreuses années à rechercher. Il a déménagé à Montréal en 1965 où il a développé son amour du dessin, et est revenu à Ottawa en 1973.


La première exposition de Chee Chee a eu lieu en 1973 à l'Université d'Ottawa. Peu de temps après, il est devenu célèbre en développant son style unique de lignes claires et gracieuses et de couleurs minimales, représentant des oiseaux et des animaux. Bien que son art comportait une grande partie de l'iconographie souvent utilisée par les artistes canadiens des Premières nations, Chee Chee avait nié que son art avait une signification symbolique. Il a plutôt qualifié les animaux présentés dans son art de "créatures du présent". Il s'est également spécifiquement qualifié d'artiste ojibway, au lieu de se laisser classer dans le filet plus large d'un simple artiste «indien».

Après avoir retrouvé sa mère et connu le succès en tant qu'artiste, Chee Chee s'est suicidé dans une prison d'Ottawa en 1977. Il a été enterré au cimetière Notre-Dame à Ottawa, en Ontario. Le travail de Chee Chee a été exposé à titre posthume partout au Canada.
Les Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa ou Saulteaux sont un groupe Anishinaabeg de peuples autochtones d'Amérique du Nord, que nombre de ses peuples autochtones appellent Turtle Island. Ils vivent au Canada et aux États-Unis et constituent l'un des plus grands groupes ethniques autochtones au nord du Rio Grande. Au Canada, ils constituent la deuxième plus grande population des Premières Nations, dépassés seulement par les Cris. Aux États-Unis, ils ont la cinquième plus grande population parmi les tribus amérindiennes, dépassés en nombre uniquement par les peuples Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw et Lakota-Dakota-Nakota.

Le peuple ojibwe a traditionnellement parlé la langue ojibwe, une branche de la famille des langues algonquiennes. Ils font partie du Conseil des Trois Feux et des Anishinaabeg, qui comprennent les Algonquins, les Nipissing, les Oji-Cris, les Odawa et les Potawatomi. Par l'intermédiaire de la branche des Saulteaux, ils faisaient également partie de la Confédération du fer rejoignant les Cris, les Assiniboines et les Métis.

La majorité des Ojibwés vivent au Canada. Il y a 77 940 Ojibwe de ligne principale; 76 760 Saulteaux et 8 770 Mississaugas, organisés en 125 bandes, et vivant de l'ouest du Québec à l'est de la Colombie-Britannique. En 2010, Ojibwe dans la population du recensement américain est de 170 742.

Les Ojibwe sont connus pour leurs canots d'écorce de bouleau, leurs rouleaux d'écorce de bouleau, l'exploitation minière et le commerce du cuivre, ainsi que la culture du riz sauvage et du sirop d'érable. Leur société Midewiwin est très respectée en tant que gardienne de parchemins détaillés et complexes d'événements, d'histoire orale, de chansons, de cartes, de souvenirs, d'histoires, de géométrie et de mathématiques.] Il est théorisé que les Ojibwa ont créé le Dreamcatcher, bien qu'il ait gagné plus de reconnaissance dans le mouvement pan-indianiste des années 1970.

Le peuple ojibwé a établi l'ordre du jour avec les dirigeants européens-canadiens en signant des traités détaillés avant d'autoriser de nombreux colons européens dans leurs régions occidentales.

La Woodland School Of Art, également appelée Woodlands style, Woodlands School ou Anishnabe painting, est un genre de peinture parmi les artistes des Premières nations et amérindiens de la région des Grands Lacs - y compris le nord de l'Ontario et le sud-ouest du Manitoba. La majorité des artistes de Woodland appartiennent aux Anishinaabeg - notamment les Ojibwe, les Odawa et les Potawatomi, ainsi que les Oji-Cris et les Cris. Le style est également connu sous le nom de Legend Painting ou Medicine Painting.]

Origine
Le style a été fondé par Norval Morrisseau, un artiste des Premières Nations Ojibwe du nord de l'Ontario, au Canada.[2] Il a appris l'histoire et la culture ojibwe principalement de son grand-père Moses "Potan" Nanakonagos et, dans les années 1950, a recueilli des récits traditionnels de sa tribu. Cette histoire orale a fourni l'inspiration et le sujet de ses peintures, et il s'est inspiré de rêves et de visions. Morrisseau a déclaré: "toute ma peinture et mon dessin sont vraiment une continuation des rouleaux du chaman." L'intaille ojibwé, les pictogrammes, l'art rupestre pétrographique et les rouleaux d'écorce de bouleau, Wiigwaasabak, étaient des antécédents stylistiques du style Woodland.

Style
Ce style visionnaire met l'accent sur les contours et les vues radiographiques des personnes, des animaux et de la vie végétale.[1] Les couleurs sont vives, voire criardes. Alors que Morrisseau a d'abord peint sur de l'écorce de bouleau, les médiums du style Woodland ont tendance à être occidentaux, comme l'acrylique, la gouache ou l'aquarelle sur papier, panneaux de bois ou toile.

Artistes de style boisé

• Jackson Beardy (Anishinini, 1944-1984)
• Benjamin Chee Chee (Ojibwé, 1944-1977)
• Shirley Cheechoo (Crie, née en 1952)
• Kelly Church (Odawa-Ojibwe, né en 1967)
• Eddy Cobiness (Ojibway, 1933–1996)
• Blake Debassige (M'Chigeeng Ojibwe, né en 1956)
• Maurice DeLangis (ᕿᓇᐅᔭ Onedia of the Thames né en 1959)
• Abe Kakepetum (Oji-Cri de Sandy Lake)
• Tom Hogan, (Ojibwé, 1955-2014)
• Norval Morrisseau (ᒥᐢᒁᐱᐦᐠ ᐊᓂᒥᐦᑮ / Miskwaabik Animikii) (Bingwi Neyaashi Ojibwe, vers 1932–2007)
• Daphné Odjig (Odawa-Potawatomi, 1919–2016)
• Carl Ray (cri de Sandy Lake, 1943-1978)
• Brian Marion (Ojibwé, 1960-2011))
• Roy Thomas (Anishinaabe, 1949–2004)
• Jackie Traverse (Anishinaabe, née en 1968)

Exposition posthume récente

1991 Benjamin Chee Chee: The Black Geese Portfolio, and Other Works. Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Ontario

1983 Contemporary Indian Art at Rideau Hall.
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Ottawa, Ontario

1982 Glebe Community Centre, Ottawa, Ontario

1977 Marion Scott Galleries, Vancouver, British Columbia
Links to Tradition.
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (travelling)
Early Exhibitions:

1976 Evans Gallery, Toronto, Ontario
The Sea Chest, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Inukshuk Gallery, Waterloo, Ontario

1974 Doma II Art Gallery, Waterloo, Ontario
Canadian Indian Art '74.
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario

1973 University of Ottawa, Ontario

Selected Collections

Canadian Museum of Civilization, Hull, Québec
Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Alberta
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Ottawa, Ontario
McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinberg, Ontario
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario
Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Thunder Bay, Ontario
Woodland Cultural Centre, Brantford, Ontario

Collections sélectionnées

Angus, Murray. "Monument marks grave of artist." Windspeaker 15, no. 4 (August 1997): 8, 24.

Burnham, Clint. Review of The Benjamin Chee Chee elegies by Patrick White. Books In Canada 22, no. 5 (Summer 1993): 59-60.

Canadian Museum of Civilization, ed. In the Shadow of the Sun: Perspectives on Contemporary Native Art. Hull, Québec: The Museum, 1993.

Cardinal-Schubert, Joane. "In the red." In Borrowed Power: Essays on Cultural Appropriation, eds. Bruce Ziff and Pratima V. Rao, 122-133. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1997.

Cardinal-Schubert, Joane. Time for Dialogue: Contemporary Artists. Calgary, Alberta: Aboriginal Awareness Society, 1992.

Dempsey, Ian. Review o f The Benjamin Chee Chee elegies by Patrick White. Canadian Materials 21, no. 1 (January 1993): 14.

McLuhan, Elizabeth, ed. Benjamin Chee Chee: Paintings and Prints in the Collection of the Thunder Bay Art Gallery. Thunder Bay, Ontario: The Gallery, 1984.

Menitove, Marcy, ed. The Permanent Collection: Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Thunder Bay, Ontario: The Gallery, 1986.

Southcott, Mary E. The Sound of the Drum: The Sacred Art of the Anishnabec. Erin, Ontario: Boston Mills Press, 1984.



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